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Rock & Roll Memoirs


It’s yucky outside. Many of us are stuck indoors (or prefer it over going out in the chilly temperatures and/or rain here in Seattle.) It’s why we have so many book stores and coffee houses! Warmth and liquid motivation. So what better way to pass the time than to read about some of your favorite rockers!

There have been quite a few new memoirs released by my favorite Jukebox Heroines. Here are the latest, plus three re-releases with extra material.

Pat Benatar – Between A Heart & A Rock Place

Belinda Carlisle – Lips Unsealed: A Memoir

Cherry Vanilla – Lick Me: How I Became Chery Vanilla

Cherie Currie – Neon Angel: A Memoir Of A Runaway

Tina Turner – I, Tina: My Life’s Story

Loretta Lynn – Loretta Lynn: Coal Miner’s Daughter

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The Iron Maidens Interview – Part 2 of 2


And now, concluding Jukebox Heroines’ exclusive interview with The Iron Maidens, Part 2. You can read part 1 here.


JBH: Ever get the “you’re really good for a girl” line? If so how do you react?

Kirsten: Fortunately, I can’t recall when the last time I heard that was. Which is a good thing, because I’m all out of any clever, witty retorts.

Linda: Of course…ha-ha. Usually I just say thanks if it is meant with good intentions. I’m happy if that’s what they think. 😉 Sometimes, if I’m in a mood, I will say, “Aw thanks, and you’re pretty cool for a guy!” ha-ha

Wanda: Yes, I’ve heard that line before and it doesn’t bother me. Most of the people who say it have good intentions: they are only pointing out that they don’t get to hear women who play well very often. That’s how I interpret it at least..it’s meant as a compliment. However, with so many women starting to get into rock, there will be a day when there are lots of really great women players out there and that line will be a thing of the past.

Courtney: Not too much actually… once or twice in my entire career so far… I react as I would react to any other comment… with a ” Why thank you!” .. at the end of the day I am a girl ! It doesn’t bother me at all because on a personal level I would be the first to say that I prefer male musicians to female musicians. Every single one of my musical influences when I started playing was male. And this is still true today.

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Women & The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame


Well gee finally!

Considering most inductees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame have been (and continue to be) men, it is nice that the place is starting to recognize the contributions women have made and continue to make to music. Their new exhibit entitled “Women Who Rock: Vision, Passion, Power” will open on May 13, 2011.

You can check out some images from the exhibit here.

Despite the lack of (que Aretha) respect given to female artists, I hope this exhibit will be a permanent or constantly updating, featuring, and a changing part of the museum, and not just a token display. A permanent exhibit would really give women the props they deserve. If it’s not permanent, it continues the notion that “women who rock”  aren’t really normal, that “women in  rock” are just a fluke. So, now that we “honored” women, back to our regular man-rocker 24/7 coverage.

From what I can tell from the website, the display will feature women in music from the 1920s with artists like Bessie Smith to current rockers like Lady Gaga. The features will include outfits worn by these women (I hope that isn’t the bulk of the exhibit….seriously these women are musicians, not models!)  handwritten song lyrics, videos, concert posters, instruments, ect. You can also record your own personal message in a recording both on how these women have shaped or impacted your life.

The exhibit will also kick off with a concert featuring the one and only Wanda Jackson and Cyndi Lauper. I am going to try my hardest to make this opening just to see those two on stage. What magic! What legends!

So, while I have some reservations as to if this exhibit will meet the standards of professional admiration, respect, and exposure for female artists that male artists receive, I am hopeful it will at least continue to remind people that women rock, and always have. While we don’t need a museum to validate our art, we will know we truly have gained what we deserve when they don’t have a special exhibit for “women who rock,” but when women are just a regular part of the museum.

Photo via The Runaways.

The Iron Maidens Interview – Part 1 of 2


Jukebox Heroines is proud to present Part 1 of a 2 part interview with the  one and only Iron Maidens.

The Iron Maidens are an all-female tribute band to the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden. Formed in 2001, in Los Angeles, they have been rocking for over 10 years to the likes of “Fear of the Dark,” “The Number of the Beast” and “Run To The Hills.”

As the only all-female Iron Maiden tribute band, these women have set standards and precedents as to how a tribute band pay’s homage to the music, the fans, and the artists themselves. They have released three tribute albums and even have their own “mascot” in similarity to Iron Maiden’s “Eddie.” Overall, the women of The Iron Maidens are savvy to the industry and to the challenges and rewards of a musical life.

The Iron Maidens are: Kirsten Rosenberg on vocals, Linda McDonald on drums, Courtney Cox on guitars, Heather Baker on guitars, and Wanda Ortiz on bass.

So, what is it like being in an all-female tribute band to an all-male band? What challenges have they faced? What rewards and triumphs? How do they deal with life on the road, gender, and maintaining their own voice? Well, Jukebox Heroines has those answers, plus more in this exclusive interview!

Thank you so much to Kirsten, Linda, Wanda, and Courtney for their time and consideration. I really appreciate your input and insight, and your rocking spirit! I know I am inspired, and I hope the readers will be as well.

From Left to Right: Heather Baker, Linda McDonald, Kirsten Rosenberg, Wanda Ortiz, Courtney Cox.

Jukebox Heroines (Emily): How did you come to be in an all-female tribute band to an all-male band?

Kirsten: Funny thing is, originally I tried to form an all-girl metal cover band a few years ago back in Baltimore but I couldn’t find other female musicians who were into the same music as me. So it’s a bit ironic that I’m in an all-girl band now paying tribute to an all-male band. Although I’m not a founding member of The Iron Maidens, I think it’s really a matter of being drawn to a great band like Iron Maiden and wanting to perform their music—yes, the gender difference is a novelty, of course, but it’s also incidental.

Linda: I was actually out scouting for a female bass player at the time and went to see a Maiden tribute with a female bass player and vocalist. By the end of the night the tables were turned and I was asked if I had any interest in joining the then-forming all female tribute to Iron Maiden. It was a no brainer! 😉

Wanda: Before we formed this tribute band, we had already known each other through working in bands together or from mutual friends or acquaintances. Coincidentally, Iron Maiden happened to be a favorite band for all of us. There were already other all-girl tributes out there at the time but none of them were doing anything as complex as Maiden ..so we all thought it would be fun as well as different to put together this project and now…here we are!

Courtney: I first found myself in an all-female tribute band to an all-male band back in Philadelphia, which is where I’m originally from. A few music gals and I formed an all King Diamond/Mercyful Fate tribute called ” Queen Diamond”….. it was better than hanging out at the mall ha-ha. From there I moved out to California a few years later and heard that the Maidens were in need of a guitar player, so I auditioned and the rest is history.

JBH: Have you faced any adversity to being accepted as a musician(s)? Many do not think musicians in cover/tribute bands are “real” musicians, so is there an extra challenge to your abilities because you are a woman/female?

Kirsten: Well, I never claimed to be a “real” musician anyway (ha ha)! As a singer, I probably get less of that criticism than someone playing an instrument. But Maiden is not exactly easy material to perform, plus all of our members are or have been part of other notable projects, as well, and have plenty of opportunities to demonstrate their chops outside of this band.

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